Engineering Education – Week 9.1 – Reading Notes

Reading:  Ambrose, 2010, “How Learning Works” “Conclusion: Applying the Seven Principles to Ourselves” and “Appendices” Summary:  Loved the very practical and direct appendices and the acknowledgment of how complex (but not impossible) to teach well and considerately. Some of the strategies are quite simple to implement but with potentially great impacts for the learning and quality of work produced by the students. Notes:  Teaching is complex “To develop mastery in teaching, we need to acquire its component skills, integrate them, and apply them appropriately. Of course, this requires that we first unpack the multifaceted task of teaching.” (Ambrose, 2010) Formative feedback … Continue reading “Engineering Education – Week 9.1 – Reading Notes”

Engineering Education – Week 8.2 – Reading Notes

Reading:  Ambrose, “How Learning Works.” Chapter 7: “How do Students Become Self-Directed Learners?” Summary   Growth mindset keeps coming to mind obviously, along with the notion that metacognition must be taught starting much earlier than college. But to do so, one must focus on first teaching it to the professors and teachers, who most likely were never taught the topic either. Beyond simply teaching about it, one must recognize that self-monitoring, self-evaluating, planning and so on, are cognitively demanding tasks that must come with high motivation to be adopted by someone who is already overloaded with their practice, research, and work. The … Continue reading “Engineering Education – Week 8.2 – Reading Notes”

Engineering Education – Week 8.1 – Reading Notes

Ambrose, 2007, Chapter 3: “What Factors Motivate Students to Learn?” Motivation -> towards a goal Subjective: values of the goals Expectancies: what do you expect out of it Goals Multiple goals are usually in operation simultaneously Conflicting, simultaneous, and even synergic goals – potentially reinforcing Performance goals “Performance goals involve protecting a desired self-image and projecting a positive reputation and public persona” Two kinds Performance-approach goals: focus on attaining competence Performance-avoidant goals: focus on avoiding incompetence Learning goals Produce deeper understanding Work-avoidant goals Finish as fast as possible with minimum effort possible Affective goals Social goals Values Attainment value Pleasure … Continue reading “Engineering Education – Week 8.1 – Reading Notes”

Engineering Education – Week 6&7 Assignments

Finally catching up with the homework and blog posts… here are the assignments for the last 2 weeks: EdTech Game Critique Assignment Empirical cognitive task analysis Learning Outcomes Assessment Readings Jan L. Plass, Bruce D. Homer & Charles K. Kinzer (2015) Foundations of Game-Based Learning, Educational Psychologist, 50:4, 258-283  Response: I highly appreciated the reading in the sense that it does not claim to have found a holistic and generalizable theory or framework for game-based learning. It comprehensively analyzes the several aspects or considerations one takes (or should take) into account when designing a game-based learning experience, and concludes that … Continue reading “Engineering Education – Week 6&7 Assignments”

Engineering Education – Week 6.1 – Reading Notes

Reading: LOFT Process Guides: Define Phase. Techniques: Writing Learning outcomes Summary: Notes: Creating and online course – tips: Establish a community of practice Start small Start early Gather your team Gear up Be aware of legal issues Vary your approach Use a style guide Learning objectives “Learning objectives describe the knowledge and skills we want students to gain from our instruction. Learning objectives are used to provide a framework for selecting and organizing course content and learning activities, guide decisions about assessment and evaluation methods, and give learners information for directing their learning efforts and monitoring their progress.  An assessment … Continue reading “Engineering Education – Week 6.1 – Reading Notes”

Engineering Education – Week 5.2 – Class Notes

Great class today with guest speaker – NYU professor Jan L. Plass – the author of this week’s reading on the foundations of Game-Based Learning.  The biggest takeaway was the distinction between a game-based learning experience vs. gamification. Gamification is a “buzz word” that people love to use or think of as a way to engage their users, to make their product more appealing, or effective. In reality, it’s a simple way of adding game-based features such as points, badges, or reward systems…    

Engineering Education – Week 5.2 – Reading Notes

Reading:  Jan L. Plass, Bruce D. Homer & Charles K. Kinzer (2015) Foundations of Game-Based Learning, Educational Psychologist, 50:4, 258-283 Summary:  I highly appreciated the reading in the sense that it does not claim to have found a holistic and generalizable theory or framework for game-based learning. It comprehensively analyzes the several aspects or considerations one takes (or should take) into account when designing a game-based learning experience, and concludes that no single approach is the most effective or essential. It also states that when designing, one can use several learning theories and several game design aspects to enhance the … Continue reading “Engineering Education – Week 5.2 – Reading Notes”

Engineering Education – Week 5.1 – Reading Notes

Reading:  Ambrose, S. A. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Notes:  Chapter 4 – “How Do Students Develop Mastery?” A Sum of Their Parts Students perform better on individual projects rather than in group projects May not poses the team work skills “Shouldn’t They Know This by Now?” Seems like the students do not learn anything from previous courses! May never have put previous knowledge into practice Whole is greater than the sum of the parts “Principle: To develop mastery, students must acquire component skills, practice integrating them, and know when to … Continue reading “Engineering Education – Week 5.1 – Reading Notes”